From employee to employer: some important reasons why you should take your time to hire.

“There’s such a difference between us

And a million miles” – Adele

Take it from the music of Grammy Award winning artist Adele, some people are just not who you thought they were. It takes a lot of life experiences and a different perspective to really understand why or why not someone will be a match for you. It takes time to get to know someone and just like finding the love of your life, the recruiting process has to be taken slowly and seriously.

And like Adele, sometimes we end up with a broken heart instead of love, just like an employer might recognize they hired a bad apple instead of a star employee. It’s in these cases that we need to learn from our mistakes and move forward instead of living life sounding like a broken record. I’ve had many jobs where I’ve sat in the passenger seat, watching the driver make the tough decisions of when to turn left or right, or when they should just flat out do a donut. In all these learning experiences I had a unique perspective on entire operations and office cultures, internalizing how the right people for the right jobs interact in particular environments.

Take your time to hire

This has given me great appreciation for how much work it takes to create that environment – that hard-working team each company needs to succeed. One of the things needed to create that great team is a solid recruiting process, one that is thoughtful, effective, and comprehensive. However, all too often employers are in a hurry to hire, and end up getting burned. Like Adele says, “They say that time’s supposed to heal ya, but I ain’t done much healing.” Employers – here’s some aloe gel insights to help heal all the recruiting burns you’ve had so far.

First, let me point out the losses that occur when the recruiting process is rushed:

  1. Lose time – If you hire someone too quickly, you might end up hiring someone unqualified, which means you end up spending more time training them. You might also discover they’re unqualified and have to re-start the process, which takes even more time.
  2. Lose money – Hiring costs money. Not just in the salary and compensation that you pay the candidate, but in the advertising, assessments, and other supplemental documents that go into acquiring that candidate. If you rush this process, you might be putting all of that money into the wrong candidate. Don’t pay twice!
  3. Lose quality – It is crucial before advertising that your job description establishes what skills, motivations, and behaviors you’re looking for. Take your time, and stick to those criteria as you screen candidates. When you hire too quickly, you could end up with someone who does not have all of the qualities you need.
  4. Lose patience – “Patience is a virtue, best keep it if you can.” This goes for recruiting as well. If you rush the process, you will lose your patience and may settle for someone less qualified. Set reasonable expectations and be thorough.
  5. Lose people – If you hire someone who is a poor fit for your company culture and work environment, then you may see a negative impact on productivity or your team morale. One of the most regrettable things that could happen to your company is hiring the wrong person and seeing your decision have a rippling effect on your employees.

Second, let me point out the positive actions you can take during the hiring process that can prevent some of those losses:

  1. Establish Timeline – The time it takes to hire someone varies for every company based on a number of factors including company priorities, location, job market, supply/demand, etc. You will likely need to set aside a longer amount of time for harder to fill roles like engineers, but you may be able to fill administrative and entry level jobs a bit faster. Set realistic expectations for yourself before you begin recruiting and set some short-term goals along the way for interviews to keep your timeline on track.
  2. Create Budget – Recruiting costs will vary for every company, but it’s important to estimate and set aside budget for your recruiting. After you have set aside the budget for the candidate’s total compensation, you need to calculate costs for assessments, background checks, and advertising. The budget for these costs will vary depending on a variety of factors, including whether or not you need to re-advertise, how many candidates you decide to assess, and more.
  3. Identify Candidate – When you are going through the screening process, make sure you are asking the right questions that help you find the right person for the job. Get to know them to make sure that their skillset, workplace behaviors and motivations are in line with your goals for the role. Ask questions like:
    1. Why do you think you are right for our company?
    2. Talk about a time that you resolved a conflict.
    3. How do you stay organized?
  4. Keep Calm – Don’t settle. You’ll find the right person for the right job, even if it takes more time than you might like. You just have to be patient. It’s a tough virtue to keep, but by continuing to advertise, interview, and meet people, not only are you getting practice in recruiting, but you are getting a better understanding of the job you are hiring for.
  5. Maintain Rapport – Keep the team you do have, happy. Make sure you are aware of your internal culture and articulate that well in your job description. When you are interviewing in-person, observe the candidate’s behavior and how they interact with your staff. Ask yourself if you can see them integrating well into your workplace. Hiring great people and keeping rapport with your team will maintain morale and productivity.

In short – take your time to hire. Recruiting isn’t a quick task you want to get checked off a “to-do” list. Set goals, a budget and a timeline before you start your recruiting process. Identify the right people for the right jobs in your company by thoroughly assessing candidate skillsets, motivations and workplace behaviors at every step in the recruiting process. Make sure they match your company culture and align with your goals for the role. Keep your employees happy and you’ll be “Rolling in the Deep.”

The candidate experience should be a high priority to companies today with the increasingly competitive labor market. The candidate experience constitutes every interaction that a company has with a candidate during the entire recruiting marketing and hiring process.

According to CareerArc “Nearly 60% of candidates have had a poor candidate experience, and 72% of those candidates shared that experience online or with someone directly.” Therefore, it is important that companies keep the candidate experience top of mind at all times and keep yourself in the job seekers shoes with every step of the recruiting and hiring process.

In November 2016 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the national unemployment rate declined to 4.6%. With the lower unemployment rate this puts the candidate back in the driver’s seat which gives the candidate a wide variety of career opportunities to choose from when seeking a new job. One bad candidate experience with your company can make a top candidate not apply for any open positions with your company in the future.

Here are some important areas to focus on during the recruiting and hiring process.

Communication

Communication is probably the single most important aspect of the entire candidate experience throughout the recruiting and hiring process. Good communication throughout the entire recruiting and hiring process is key from the recruiting marketing to the final interview to the last step of making an offer or rejection is essential for the candidate to walk away with a positive experience. It is essential that your top candidates know where they are at in the recruiting process therefore a Hiring Manager needs to be consistent with their  communications. Once candidates have been phone screened let them know if they are moving on in the recruiting process to the next step of an in-person interview. If you have decided not to move forward with a candidate, politely send them an email letting them know that they are no longer being considered for the role and thank them for their interest in the company. Some companies will have multiple rounds of in-person interviews which will take weeks to facilitate the interview process so communicate the next steps after each interview if the candidate will be passed along to the next interview. One big mistake that many companies will make is not to follow-up with a candidate once they have reached the stage to the final interviews. This lack of communication will definitely leave a bad impression on the candidate in which they may no longer have an interest in working for your organization in the future. Remember that candidates are heavily invested once they get to the interview phase and the candidate’s time is valuable in which some candidates are taking time off of work to pursue this new career opportunity.

Positive candidate experienceOnce the candidate has been considered qualified for the role and is seriously being pursued by the organization you should make sure that you send the candidates customized emails. Communicate clearly as to what stage in the recruiting process they are in and always personalize the message.

Candidate Interactions

Each interaction that the company has with a candidate is very important and one bad interaction can leave a lasting negative impression. In the age of social media bad reviews spread faster than good reviews. Each candidate interaction over the phone and in-person is key to a positive candidate experience. Some candidates may have negative experiences if they are not greeted warmly by the receptionists, or if they are left waiting in the lobby too long before the interview, or if the Manager was distracted and not very attentive during the interview. Therefore, every company should think about these small things during the candidate recruiting process and ensure that every touch with the candidate is professional, timely and positive.

Candidate Drop Off

Every company has their unique recruiting process. Some companies recruiting process can take anywhere from 2 weeks to several months depending upon how many interviews, assessments, skill tests and background checks the candidate must withstand. Typically the candidate drop off can be anywhere from 60% to 90%. This will depend largely on how long the recruiting process takes, timely communication during the recruiting process and the number of people in your candidate pool. Also keep in mind that top candidates are in huge demand so they will not stay on the job market for long. If you have a large candidate pool expect that the drop off rate will be fairly significant. It is imperative that your company implements a streamlined recruiting process that takes a candidate seamlessly through the process in a reasonable amount of time.

Companies will invest a lot of time and resources recruiting throughout the year to meet the goals and objectives of the company. Lastly, here are a few recruiting statistics from officevibe.com that your company should consider when developing and streamlining the recruiting process. On average it will take 27 working days for a company to make a new hire. Keeping this in mind will help you plan accordingly for each role that you may need to hire for. When it comes to candidate experience 66% of candidates believe that all interactions with current employees are the best way to get insight into a company. Therefore, every touch that the candidate has with a potential employee should be positive because it will leave a lasting impression and will affect your employer brand and reputation.

In our high-tech, modern internet age, life moves pretty fast.  And no device helps us navigate the day-to-day struggles like a smartphone.  It’s something that has become ubiquitous and indispensable, which is pretty remarkable considering it’s a device that didn’t exist ten years ago.   Smartphones have changed the game for many industries.  From scheduling to gaming, to watching and making movies, or taking your office on the road, we can do practically anything with a mobile phone nowadays —  Even look for jobs.

Whether you are an employer looking to hire, or a candidate in search of a new job, mobile technology is impacting you. Smartphones make it easy to connect to job sites and see and apply to open positions.  Many career sites that allow someone to store their pertinent details online now have smartphone apps to make looking at jobs even faster and easier.  With the rise of internet browsing by mobile job seekers , we decided to parse through some of our recent traffic data and analyze what mobile job seekers are doing when they visit NewHire® jobs.  Our conclusions have shown, mobile users are like window shoppers.  Most candidates are “just looking”  – and few are actually buying.

We’ve found that our mobile traffic has skyrocketed in the last year. But all that extra traffic is just people looking at job ads, and not actually applying. Our conversion rate* (the number of applicants divided by the number of candidate views)  in that time has plummeted.  Interestingly though, we’ve also found that people in specific jobs or industries are more predisposed to apply by mobile device.

Highlights!

Mobile candidate traffic, on jobs advertised by NewHire®, has exploded this year.  In 2015  approximately  22%  of candidate traffic was from Mobile. this year, through October 2016,  that traffic has increased to almost 39%. of our total job seeker traffic. This increased mobile traffic is ALL JOBSEEKERS including people who only view applications AND people who actually apply.

Mobile Activity 2014-2016

Tip: Click our graphs to make them larger!

Mobile Desktop Views 2014-2016

Mobile Desktop Applies 2014-2016

When we dig deeper we see that mobile job seekers are window shoppers. They look but when it comes to applying for jobs on their mobile device, they are not buying. Our Mobile Views doubled this year compared to 2015. However those mobile viewers MOSTLY DID NOT CHOOSE TO APPLY TO THOSE JOBS ON THEIR DEVICE.  In 2016, through October,  we’ve had almost 300,000 views from Mobile devices, more than double all of 2015!  However, our mobile Apply count for 2016 is just about the same as for 2015.  Our 2016 Conversion Rate* for jobs has plummeted for Mobile traffic. There has not been been a noticeable increase in applicants to correspond with the increase in views.

Mobile Conversion Rates 2014-2016

But the story is more complicated. It turns out that some jobs attract lots of mobile applicants and others attract very few.  People who DO apply to jobs from their devices are doing so in some interesting industries.  The jobs with the highest Mobile Apply activity in 2015 and 2016 include those in the Medical field, those in Skilled Trade, Drivers, and Food Service Workers — these are all professions where someone doesn’t spend a lot of time sitting at a computer and probably won’t be filling out a job application that way.

Conversely, we noticed very low Mobile Apply activity for jobs including Executives, Managers, Engineers and Human Resources workers, who usually have better access to computers during their normal routines.

Top Mobile Activity By Job Industry

Mobile Activity by Job Industry

Why are Mobile users just window shopping? There could be any number of reasons. It could be related to job  or industry or location. It could be that candidates are looking and then coming back and applying later on either a desktop computer, or on their device. Or it could be that mobile employment applications are only important for some jobs and much less important for others.

Tl;dr or Key takeaways on Mobile Jobseekers

  • Mobile candidate traffic is rising and will continue to be important force in the employment market place in 2017.
  • Many mobile applicants are just window shopping and not applying for work.
  • For specific jobs including drivers, food service workers, skilled trades and medical – mobile is an important for capturing applicants. Be sure these types of jobs are advertising  on mobile platforms and be sure you have a mobile optimized application process.
  • For job in engineering, human resources or at the executive level mobile is much less crucial for capturing applicants.

Definitions:

  • Views = the count of people who look at a NewHire® candidate landing page and application. This link is an example of an application.
  • Applies = the count of people who submits an employment application to NewHire® for a specific employment opportunity.
  • Conversion Rate = Applicants (Applies/ Views) people who successfully fill out a job application) / Viewers (People who view a specific Job application

 

 

Imagine your worst nightmare as a recruiter – you’ve just found the perfect candidate for your job, they’ve passed through every interview, passed every test and have been universally accepted by everyone you’ve consulted with — except that one group you forgot to include, who now say this candidate is a no go.  Or maybe it’s the President of the company who has their own opinion of what the candidate’s qualification should be. In either scenario – you’re back to square one with your recruiting. How could this happen?  More importantly – how can it be prevented in the future.

These hiring misfires can happen because – before even sitting down to figure out the basics of the job you are recruiting for – you’ve failed to identify all of the Stakeholders involved.

Avoiding Hiring RoadblocksWhat’s a stakeholder?  In a project sense – a stakeholder is a person or group, internal or external to your company, that has an interest in your project, or will be somehow affected by the outcome of your project.  Stakeholders can have a direct or indirect interest and influence in your project, and knowing how to identify them all and manage their relationships to your project is a major task of a project manager.

In a Recruiting Sense – A Stakeholder is a group or individual who will either have a direct influence on the hiring process, or will be affected in some way by the hiring outcome.  Some are more influential than others, but all stakeholders will have some impact on the hire.

Some examples of recruiting stakeholders include:

  • Other groups/ teams in your company
  • Company Executives
  • Outside Vendors or Contractors
  • Unions
  • Customers (for external recruiters)

It’s in the best interest of the recruiter to identify all possible stakeholders and get them all on the same page with all the issues concerning the job being recruited. That way, any disagreements or other obstacles can be identified and addressed at the beginning of the process and not when candidates are at the door. That will ensure a smoother and more timely recruiting process and save time and money in the long run.

Small businesses hire sales people. Big businesses hire sales forces. There’s a very important distinction there. Given that only 1 in 4 sales people have the competence, the behaviors, the beliefs, and the motivations to be elite in a given organization, hiring a sales force is a numbers game that small businesses can’t afford to play. And yet, everyday we see small businesses doing the same things as their larger counterparts. They throw out a job description, collect resumes, find people with experience and that “sales” personality, and make a hire based on unreliable criteria.

Here’s a good example. These are two real candidates for a sales job for which NewHire recently recruited. The employer needed a business-to-business sales representative to sell software to CEO’s and owners of small and medium-sized businesses. The position required a salesperson to do mostly over-the-phone sales, where some leads would be provided, but the salesperson would have to supplement via their own prospecting. I will refer to two of the candidates in their applicant pool as Candidate A and Candidate B, and describe their sales talents in the same depth that we discovered them:

Candidate A, according to her resume:

Selecting Sales People

  • Worked in sales for 8 months before leaving the company and taking a job as a social media marketing manager for a research consulting agency
  • Had a 3 month gap in her work history, and not much information on experience beyond that one sales job
  • Has a bachelor’s degree from a small liberal arts college
  • Describes herself as “talented and results focused”

Candidate B, according to his resume:

  • Been in sales for 7 years and has just recently taken a sales management role for a “burgeoning technology company”
  • His sales experience was mostly business-to-business with some business-to-consumer experience
  • Has a bachelor’s degree from a Big Ten school
  • Describes himself as “loyal”

Given the above information, you might take a guess at which candidate is the better sales representative. Candidate B clearly has more experience. He also fits the industry that the employer works in, and has even moved up into sales management, right? If you’re like most companies, you would phone screen Candidate B and toss Candidate A in the resume shredder. Luckily, NewHire didn’t rely on this information alone. When we took a closer look, the picture of each candidate became a lot clearer.

Based on their answers to our careful questioning and an OMG Assessment, here’s what we learned about each candidate.

beliefs

sale-behaviors

truth-resumes

After further review, Candidate A clearly has the competency, skills, and behaviors that fit the employer’s need and are correlated with sales success. Here’s the deal: given a phone interview and a few in-person conversations, the employer probably never would have hired Candidate B anyway. Despite the attractive resume, they would have uncovered that he was not a fit and moved on — wasting only their valuable time in the process. The problem is not that Candidate B would have been hired… It’s that Candidate A would have never even been interviewed given the contents of her resume alone!

She was the perfect candidate and ended up being a very successful hire for the employer. Had they relied on her resume, she wouldn’t have had a chance at even talking to the employer on the phone. That’s the impact that the average hiring process has on the ability for a small business to hire successful salespeople. In some jobs, you can get by just screening for experience (although I would argue that including behaviors, motivations, and skills in the early stages of any recruitment search is ideal.) In sales, failing to uncover appropriate information about your candidate before ruling them out of the process is the number one way to miss out on your next superstar.

Imagine the impact a salesperson from the top 10% could have on your business this year alone. Can you afford to continue hiring the same, dangerous way just because resume screening is how you’ve always done it? No matter how you do it, a small business in search of a sales superstar must find out about a candidate’s sales behaviors and beliefs before making a yes or no decision on the candidate. Setting up a process that is specific to your company by which you can learn relevant information about a candidate before ruling them out will yield better results every time. There are plenty of tools out there to help save you time in building a custom process, but clearly it must be built. The old guess and check method for hiring salespeople is unsustainable, as the example above shows.

If you’re interested in learning more about the sales behaviors and beliefs that correlate to success in sales in all positions, and finding out which things to look out for that will make a difference for candidates at your company, check out Dave Kurlan’s White Paper on Sales Selection.

In recent months, NewHire has emphasized various reasons why we believe employers need to reconsider how the resume fits into their recruiting process. As the primary tool of assessing candidates, the resume is an antiquated, time consuming, and overall inaccurate way of identifying which candidates will be a fit for a position. However, beyond resumes being ineffective as a screening tool, there are more nefarious results of employers hiring on resumes alone: racial discrimination.

The Research

In 2002, University of Chicago Booth School of Business researchers Marianne Bertrand and Sendhil Mullainatghan published an article titled “Are Emily and Brendan More Employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination”. As that title implies, the research’s purpose was to investigate the impact of candidate names and implied race influenced the likelihood of receiving a callback from employers after submitting a resume. Focusing on the Chicago and Boston markets, resumes were randomly assigned a name that implied the candidate’s race as either white (i.e. Emily, Brendan) or black (i.e. Lakisha, Jamal). They also measured the impact of improvements to resume credentials increased the response rate. All combined, they sent out over 5000 resumes to a variety of industries and positions.

The results were staggering. Resumes with names typically associated with white candidates elicited approximately 50% more callbacks than those with perceived black candidate names. Furthermore, adding additional, higher credentials to resumes (more experience, more education) resulted in a 30% jump in calls to “white” resumes. Those same improvements to “black” resumes resulted in little to no improvement in the rate of being contacted by employers.

There is little reason to think things have changed since the year the study took place. In 2014, a man named José Zamora received national news attention when, in an effort to improve his job search results, he started to drop the “s” in his name to “Joe Zamora”. With that one letter change, results improved. Watch the video below to hear José’s story:

Organizations like Career Pathways recognize the problem and have worked to improve career opportunities for disadvantaged candidates. A PSA launched in 2014 titled “Grads of Life”, while not explicitly focused on assisting candidates of color, strongly urges employers to consider candidates from diverse backgrounds. The campaign remains active and, I can say from personal experience, has had subway and bus ads spring up around Chicago. I took the photo below waiting for the train earlier this year:

Resumes and racial bias

What can employers do to prevent discrimination?

Intentional or not, hiring managers are susceptible to displaying racial discrimination in the hiring process. One sure fire way of preventing such discrimination is to utilize a screening process and tool that allows hiring managers to get candidates to answer the questions that matter most to doing the job and then having the ability to search on those answers to identify top talent. Lucky for you, that’s what NewHire does! Not only will our Applicant Tracking System (ATS) cut down on the amount of time you spend reading resumes, it will also ensure that candidates are being judged on their competencies and experiences and not their age, sex, or race.

Maybe you’ve heard of the commonly cited word problem made popular in the psychology and behavioral economics field by Nobel prize winning economist Daniel Kahneman and his late colleague Amos Tversky. It goes like this:

Linda is 31 years old, single, outspoken, and very bright. She majored in philosophy. As a student, she was deeply concerned with issues of discrimination and social justice, and also participated in anti-nuclear demonstrations.

Which is more probable?

   a. Linda is a bank teller.

   b. Linda is a bank teller and is active in the feminist movement. [1]

The obvious answer is B, right? Based on that 3 sentence description, it’s pretty likely that Linda is active in the feminist movement. Heck, she’s probably a vegan, too! Am I right?

No.

I’m actually very wrong.

Let’s do the math real quick. How many people are bank tellers? Let’s represent that number of people with the variable x. Now, of that group of people who are bank tellers, how many are also active in the feminist movement? Well, since this group must meet both the conditions (feminist and bank teller), we know that it is a subset of x. With that in mind, clearly it is more likely that Linda is a bank teller than it is that Linda is a bank teller and some other thing. But, the feminist narrative fits her so well. Our unconscious biases take one look at her description as a social justice warrior and become vulnerable to the presumption that she, like so many of the people we know with similar descriptions, is an active feminist. 

This is an example of the conjunction fallacy. And if you were one of the people who was saying B was the correct answer, you’re in the majority. In one study, 85% of respondents said B, even though it is quite literally impossible for B to be more likely. [2]

Hiring is so broken

So? What gives? What’s at play here? And how does it relate to hiring?

Well, that story you just told yourself about Linda. It’s the same kind of story that’s keeping you from finding the right person to fill your open jobs.

Let’s say you are hiring for a Sales Rep. At some point in time, you’ve collected a stack of resumes. You look over the first few and start a Yes pile, a Maybe pile, and upon reading the third resume, you decide to start a No pile… in the trash. What was wrong with the third resume? Well, there was this gap in it. And usually when there’s a gap in a resume, it means the person did something bad that kept them out of work for a while.

The reason hiring is broken

I hear this “gap” story all of the time. There are hundred of other stories as well, ones that land your target candidate in the trash instead of at your doorstep. The problem with these “stories” is that they force us into thinking that what might be true must  be true. Heck, if we didn’t have some short cut for sifting through resumes, we’d be reading them for hours! But when it comes to a talent market that is already so tight, can you really afford to throw away someone with a gap in their resume without first confirming why there was a gap? Not to mention, if you had to defend your hiring process to a group of your peers, do you really think that focusing on “gaps” rather than focusing on sales skills, behaviors, and motivators would pass the eye test? The fact of the matter is, the biases that are inherent in resume reading give you about a 50% chance of failing the hiring process before you even pick up the phone and call someone for the first time. [3]

Now this might be the point in this article where you’re saying to yourself, “Okay, I get it. A lot of people are biased. The resume isn’t perfect. But I am certainly not as biased as most people.”

I’d like to introduce you to another form of bias called “the bias blind spot.” According to a Princeton University study, in a sample of 600 Americans, only 1 person considered herself more biased than the average American. That’s right — only 0.2% of the population actually believes they are in the top 50 percentile of bias. 85% of people believed they were less biased than the average American. [4] That is to say, not only are we extremely biased, but we also tend to underestimate just how biased we are.

The reason that hiring is broken has much less to do with a skills gap and much more to do with the fact that humans are the ones in charge of doing the hiring. And humans, by their very nature, are fallible. But where humans have shown immense progress is when we recognize our own fallibility. Think about some of the most important inventions of the modern era — airplanes, computers, and sliced bread. None of these could have been invented if we didn’t first recognize that we were unable to compute complex algorithms quickly, we were unable to slice loaves evenly, and we were unable to grow wings and fly. When it comes to hiring, we need to stop trying to grow wings and start building the darn airplane.

Where do we start?

At NewHire, we believe that every time you recruit, you follow a six step process. Those six steps start with Preparing to Recruit. This means sitting down and ironing out the profile of your target candidate. Who are they reporting to? What challenges will they face? What behaviors and motivations are going to be significant in reporting to that person and facing those challenges? What are the specific skills necessary for success? If you aren’t answering these questions before you start looking for candidates, then when it comes time to make decisions, you are bound to be comparing candidates against one another rather than comparing them against the ideal. Figure out what your ideal candidate acts like, and then hold yourself accountable to finding that person.

There are a handful of great methods out there for sourcing candidates. If you’re not an expert at this, there is help everywhere you look. So ask around (heck, ask me) and you should find what you need. [5] This is the piece of the recruiting process that has advanced a lot since the days of “Help Wanted” signs in the window. The next piece of the airplane that we need to build is the screening method. This is crucial. Instead of using resumes as your screening agent and inviting all of that bias into the process before you ever get kicked off, I think it makes sense to use a short questionnaire. Some multiple choice and short answer questions that are aimed at getting the right person to answer questions that prove they’re the right person. If you keep this questionnaire short, candidates will appreciate the opportunity to prove they’re right for the job. This will change everything. Now, instead of finding reasons not to call someone, you’re going to be finding reasons why you should call people. They have the years of experience. They have skills x, y, and z. They prefer to work autonomously rather than being closely managed.  And if you have it set up right, you’ll be able to search your results based on the answers to these questions, making your Yes, No, and Maybe piles automated, saving you tons of time and holding you accountable to the things you said were important at the start.

If you do these two things, your hiring is guaranteed to improve immediately. Not to mention, you might actually start to enjoy the process. The final piece of the pie is the interview stage — which would require another 1200 words. Maybe next time…

Interested in learning how to attract those top candidates? Check out our guide for Crafting Effective Recruitment Advertising. It’s a great way to ensure that your talent pipeline stays full of qualified candidates in an increasingly competitive market. 

Indeed is one of the largest aggregators of jobs in the world, and if your job isn’t there, you’re losing a ton of visibility. When someone Googles “entry level jobs in Chicago,”  you can bet that Indeed is one of the first sites to show in the results. So when a candidate goes to click on that site, it’s important that your job stands out on the first few pages as they start their job search. As an agency partner of Indeed, we have learned the ins and outs of what really makes a job shine and how to increase visibility and clicks over the competition.

Make your Indeed Ads Glow in the Dark

Here are a few tips and guidelines for Indeed and the rest of your advertising to help your job stand out from the rest.

Job Titles

There are a lot of things to consider in choosing your job title for Indeed. Probably one of the easiest things you can do is take the title you are considering, type it into their search engine with the location and see what appears. You will see immediately how other companies are using the same job title, or what other job titles are more popular for you to consider that fit your job description.

Do:

Sales Representative

OR

Include an industry to be more descriptive

Sales Representative – Insurance

Don’t:

Sales Representatives needed at top notch company!!!

OR

Sales Representative/Insurance

Sales Representative-Insurance

Salary

Research and surveys conducted on job seekers show that either their first or second priority in choosing a company to work for is compensation (right before or after work culture). Because of this, it is crucial that you include compensation in your recruitment advertisement. If you are not sure what the exact compensation is, it is okay to include a range,so long as that range isn’t too wide. If it is a sales role, you can list potential first year on target earnings, but be realistic.

When listing the salary, make sure to include spaces between your dashes, slashes, and symbols alike.

Do:  

$50,000 – $55,000

$11 / Hour

Don’t:

$50,000 -$55,000

$50,000-$55,000

$11/Hour

Why? If you post any of the “don’ts,” it may feed into the Indeed system improperly, causing your job to display incorrect or incomplete salary information. For best practices stick to the “do’s” format listed above.

Reader Friendliness

No one likes to read a wall of text. To make your ad stand out amongst the rest, make sure your ad is reader-friendly. Bold your job title and your company name to make them stand out so the candidate knows who they are applying to and what job. Use headers to separate your sections of topics such as compensation, duties, and requirements. You can use bullet points to to elaborate and outline the aspects of the job, but don’t get too detailed as you want the candidate to complete your application by answering your customized screening questions they will need to read as well.

Do:

SAMPLE COMPANY seeks a JOB TITLE to ……

Add more information below regarding the company culture, employee value proposition, and some details about what the company is looking for in the ideal candidate.

To the JOB TITLE we offer:

  • Compensation & benefits

Duties & Responsibilities of the JOB TITLE:

  • Here you can add a few key job duties (we recommend no more than 6)

Requirements of the JOB TITLE:

  • Here you can add a few key job requirements (we recommend no more than 6-8)
  • This can include years experience, degree, software needs, travel, etc.

Tip: The bottom of your ad is a great place to add that you are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Location

On our applications, we have one slot for putting in a location. As with most standard locations, you enter a city, state and zip code. It is important for this piece of information to be either true for your position, or to be listed in a proper format. You cannot list multiple cities in one box for the same state, and you should only include a slash when appropriate. Job seekers will often type in the location in which they live or are moving, so having the location correct is important.

Do:

Dallas, TX

Dallas / Fort Worth, TX

Don’t:

Dalas, TX

Dallas / Ft. Worth, TX

Dallas/Fort Worth/Arlington, TX

Trend Reporting:

Check on your job! If you are worried about getting candidates before you advertise, ask a NewHire staff member for suggestions on your job title or ad and get some expert advice. It is also worthwhile to go on Indeed and type in the job title you are thinking of using and your location to see what competitors are using for their job titles. You can also visit this link to compare jobs on a variety of industry trend reports to see what titles, locations, and keywords are working best.

After you have advertised, NewHire can pull your analytics to see how many views and applies you have received from Indeed. We can also work with Indeed to get you a customized report to discover what keywords candidates used to find your job(s), and what locations (if you used multiple) performed best for your position(s).
Hiring is always a tad easier when you’re proactive by putting out the best written, formatted, and optimized recruitment job advertisement possible. If you keep these tips in mind and ensure that your ad is looking and performing well on Indeed, it’s safe to assume that you will draw applicants for any additional job boards as well.

 

broadcastWant to know more about the changing world of recruiting and hiring? Check out our Webinar series, where you will learn to take complete control of the 6-Step Hiring process that defines who fills that next open seat. 

Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of participating as a panelist in The Alternative Board’s Prosperity Series, an ongoing series of events aimed at assisting small to mid-size businesses. This panel’s subject focused on what companies can do to find candidates in the digital age.

To see a written summary of the topics covered, please visit here Steve Davies’ blog here. If there is anything that you have questions on or would have interest in speaking to me or anyone at NewHire about, please reach out (877-923-0054). Here are a few photos of the panel and networking event:

 

The Alternative Board’s Prosperity Series - Finding Candidates

The Alternative Board’s Prosperity Series - Finding Candidates

 

 

Back to the Future of Recruiting

“Your kids, Marty. Something has got to be done about your kids!”

Doc Brown had a point when he took Marty to the year 2015. Something had to be done about us, residents of the year 2015. And although Doctor Emmett Brown may not have been the strongest recruiting mind of our time, I must give credit where credit is due.

Imagine you are in the year 1985 searching for a job. You are laboring over the typewriter to craft a perfect resume, knowing that you will probably have to drive around in search of “Help wanted” signs in the windows, drop a copy of that perfect resume off, and sit anxiously by the phone awaiting a call. There is no email. There is no internet. There is facsimile. Oh the glorious fax machine, invented over 20 years ago and beyond reproach — the greatest technological advancement since the telegraph.

And then, lo and behold, in the middle of your job search a disgraced nuclear physicist who you may have hung out with a time or two comes by the house with a piece of equipment a million times more advanced than your precious facsimile device. In a time machine, the two of you travel forward in time to the year 2015. Not only are their hoverboards and self-driving cars, but there is a magic box with keys and a screen that allows you to connect with anyone in the world with the click of a button. These “computers” not only have the power to communicate across thousands and thousands of miles, but they also allow a user to input, store, process, and output information in fractions of a second.

These machines have become the center of the universe. People everywhere in the futuristic 2015 world are staring at miniature computation devices meant for phone calling, communicating via electronic mail or text message, and playing games. Walking aimlessly on and off sidewalks into the and out of the danger of traffic, so engrossed in these devices that they are relatively unaware of the physical world around them, the humans operating these miniature computers need no location. Humans can be truly present without being physically present.

But alas, you can’t just exist in the year 2015. In order to stay, you’ll need money. And due to astronomical rate of inflation, the old Nickel and Dime stores have become — what is that? — A DOLLAR? Great Scott! That pocket change from the year 1985 will be of no use around here.

A job. You need a job.

But, this is going to be disastrous. The people of the year 2015 must find jobs in a way that has advanced far beyond the old “send and pray resume” method. Given these “computers” and all of this “software,” someone must have found a way to attract, filter, and select talent seamlessly.

What then, will you do with your resume? It’s so bland. It’s so non-specific. It’s so… old.

Hold on. You sir, what’s that you’re doing? You’re just sending in your resume to that employer electronically? But, what about the softwares and the computation devices? They’re not being used to make the resume a thing of the past? People are still asking for you to fax in your resume?

Despite computers and software that give us the tools to match employers with specific candidates for employment that meet their criteria in the click of a button, almost everyone has taken this “send and pray resume” method and simply put it online?

Man, this is heavy. But, couldn’t you send out questionnaires with queries meant to narrow in on ideal criteria? And now that everyone has a device meant to communicate with anyone at any time, if my calculations are correct, these questionnaires could be available en masse via independent landing pages shared across the internet in certain hubs where job seekers hang out. This way, when looking for a job, a candidate can prove their worth to employers in terms that are mutually understood. Heck, this futuristic world could go beyond mere experience when deciding on whom to interview. You could develop methods to understand an employee’s behaviors, their motivations, and their very skills.

Recruiting is an essential business function. How could you, the hyperintelligent beings of the future, have left such an important piece of your lives in the hands of a mere resume? Something has got to be done. Dear employers of the great future, in 2016, I beg you to trust in the one page questionnaire and compare candidates against the same criteria. Rid the world of the resume. Unless… what are you? Chicken?

 

broadcastWant to know more about the changing world of recruiting and hiring? Check out our Webinar series, where you will learn to take complete control of the 6-Step Hiring process that defines who fills that next open seat.