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Indeed is one of the largest aggregators of jobs in the world, and if your job isn’t there, you’re losing a ton of visibility. When someone Googles “entry level jobs in Chicago,”  you can bet that Indeed is one of the first sites to show in the results. So when a candidate goes to click on that site, it’s important that your job stands out on the first few pages as they start their job search. As an agency partner of Indeed, we have learned the ins and outs of what really makes a job shine and how to increase visibility and clicks over the competition.

Make your Indeed Ads Glow in the Dark

Here are a few tips and guidelines for Indeed and the rest of your advertising to help your job stand out from the rest.

Job Titles

There are a lot of things to consider in choosing your job title for Indeed. Probably one of the easiest things you can do is take the title you are considering, type it into their search engine with the location and see what appears. You will see immediately how other companies are using the same job title, or what other job titles are more popular for you to consider that fit your job description.

Do:

Sales Representative

OR

Include an industry to be more descriptive

Sales Representative – Insurance

Don’t:

Sales Representatives needed at top notch company!!!

OR

Sales Representative/Insurance

Sales Representative-Insurance

Salary

Research and surveys conducted on job seekers show that either their first or second priority in choosing a company to work for is compensation (right before or after work culture). Because of this, it is crucial that you include compensation in your recruitment advertisement. If you are not sure what the exact compensation is, it is okay to include a range,so long as that range isn’t too wide. If it is a sales role, you can list potential first year on target earnings, but be realistic.

When listing the salary, make sure to include spaces between your dashes, slashes, and symbols alike.

Do:  

$50,000 – $55,000

$11 / Hour

Don’t:

$50,000 -$55,000

$50,000-$55,000

$11/Hour

Why? If you post any of the “don’ts,” it may feed into the Indeed system improperly, causing your job to display incorrect or incomplete salary information. For best practices stick to the “do’s” format listed above.

Reader Friendliness

No one likes to read a wall of text. To make your ad stand out amongst the rest, make sure your ad is reader-friendly. Bold your job title and your company name to make them stand out so the candidate knows who they are applying to and what job. Use headers to separate your sections of topics such as compensation, duties, and requirements. You can use bullet points to to elaborate and outline the aspects of the job, but don’t get too detailed as you want the candidate to complete your application by answering your customized screening questions they will need to read as well.

Do:

SAMPLE COMPANY seeks a JOB TITLE to ……

Add more information below regarding the company culture, employee value proposition, and some details about what the company is looking for in the ideal candidate.

To the JOB TITLE we offer:

  • Compensation & benefits

Duties & Responsibilities of the JOB TITLE:

  • Here you can add a few key job duties (we recommend no more than 6)

Requirements of the JOB TITLE:

  • Here you can add a few key job requirements (we recommend no more than 6-8)
  • This can include years experience, degree, software needs, travel, etc.

Tip: The bottom of your ad is a great place to add that you are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Location

On our applications, we have one slot for putting in a location. As with most standard locations, you enter a city, state and zip code. It is important for this piece of information to be either true for your position, or to be listed in a proper format. You cannot list multiple cities in one box for the same state, and you should only include a slash when appropriate. Job seekers will often type in the location in which they live or are moving, so having the location correct is important.

Do:

Dallas, TX

Dallas / Fort Worth, TX

Don’t:

Dalas, TX

Dallas / Ft. Worth, TX

Dallas/Fort Worth/Arlington, TX

Trend Reporting:

Check on your job! If you are worried about getting candidates before you advertise, ask a NewHire staff member for suggestions on your job title or ad and get some expert advice. It is also worthwhile to go on Indeed and type in the job title you are thinking of using and your location to see what competitors are using for their job titles. You can also visit this link to compare jobs on a variety of industry trend reports to see what titles, locations, and keywords are working best.

After you have advertised, NewHire can pull your analytics to see how many views and applies you have received from Indeed. We can also work with Indeed to get you a customized report to discover what keywords candidates used to find your job(s), and what locations (if you used multiple) performed best for your position(s).
Hiring is always a tad easier when you’re proactive by putting out the best written, formatted, and optimized recruitment job advertisement possible. If you keep these tips in mind and ensure that your ad is looking and performing well on Indeed, it’s safe to assume that you will draw applicants for any additional job boards as well.

 

broadcastWant to know more about the changing world of recruiting and hiring? Check out our Webinar series, where you will learn to take complete control of the 6-Step Hiring process that defines who fills that next open seat. 

This is a true story about a mid-sized manufacturing company in Oklahoma that needed some help finding the right person for their job…

 

For any company, recruiting can be a daunting task. From putting the ad together and advertising to managing a large pile of applications and resumes – the entire process can be a headache for business owners or hiring managers who don’t have the right tools in place before they start. Especially when you are stuck handling the process single handedly or on a small team, screening alone can dominate your time. Much of this is true for companies in the manufacturing industry – companies like Progressive Stamping, who reached out to NewHire.

When Dave Younge, President at Progressive Stamping, initially contacted NewHire, he expressed interest in establishing a recruiting process and getting assistance filling an Account Manager position.

“I wanted a person that would be a good fit to our organization’s culture.  I did not want a person who had great skills and experience but was a poor person with whom to work.  I shared this concern with Sean Little (Account Manager) and asked how NewHire could make that happen.  He demonstrated the technology and explained how they could customize the application.” – Dave Younge – President of Progressive Stamping

He needed the framework to get started, and then he would be able to drive the hiring process forward on his own. With these things in mind, he purchased our NewHire Elements service.

Continue Reading…

Rejection is hard. No one likes to say no, and no one likes to be said no to. But when you have two to three great candidates, and only one job title to hire for in your company, unfortunately, you will have to deliver some bad news. There are a few things to think about before you speak with a candidate who isn’t moving forward.

Delivering bad news to candidates

First, understand why you need to follow up.

The farther a candidate goes into your process, the more interested they are in working for your company. They are investing more time and energy into landing a spot in your special role. If they are not the right fit, don’t lead them on or hang them out to dry. It is good to keep them in the loop, but also important to consider the timing of your response. If if you’re in the phone screening phase, and you know early on they won’t be a good fit, then deliver the news. By avoiding them or not following up altogether, you might be holding them back from other opportunities that they could be going after. However, if it is a candidate that has moved further along in the process, you should wait to deliver them a rejection until the other top candidate officially accepts. If the candidate does not accept, you will have another top candidate or candidates at the ready. Whereas if you were to reject all the other candidates right away and your pick does not accept, you will have to re-start the process.

Second, consider the method.

If you are turning down a candidate who had made it to the final stages of the process such as second interviews, you should call them. Let them know that you appreciated their time throughout the process and that it was a hard decision. If you would consider hiring them for another position in the future, let them know that they should apply for those opportunities if they really want to work at your company later on. If your candidates did not pass the phone interview or first interview, a general follow-up email would suffice to let them know you will not be pursuing their candidacy, but appreciate their interest and time.

Third, don’t feel so terrible.

Yes, telling a candidate that they aren’t moving forward certainly isn’t joyous, especially if you have met with them a few times and they are in your top two. But think of it this way – if they were so qualified to make it that far in your process – imagine how far they made it (or will make it) in some other company’s process. It is likely that the candidate you reject will accept an offer somewhere else, so you shouldn’t feel like you ruined all of their hopes and dreams. Think positive, and understand that the candidate you reject will probably find another opportunity that is better suited for them.

Lastly, business is business, but remember bad news shouldn’t leave a bad impression.

When you deliver a rejection, whether it be in person, via email, or over the phone, make sure to do it gently. While you want to make it clear that you won’t be moving them forward, you also don’t want to say it in a condescending or harsh way. Every interaction you have with a candidate is a chance to sell your Employee Value Proposition to the talent world. Leaving them feeling like their time was wasted or they were bad candidates will give them a bad impression of your company and how you treat people. This can lead to bad company reviews online or through word of mouth, so be sure to get your point across in a nice way. If a candidate presses you on why they are not moving forward, you can explain it was a difficult decision, competitive, and you had to consider every detail. Be very careful in your choice of words when delivering the news. You do not want to say anything that would put you or your company  in a situation where you risk being accused of discrimination. The best thing to do is to thank them for their time and wish them the best moving forward on their job search.

For most people, rejecting someone or taking rejection is just plain difficult, but it’s a necessary task. We can’t hire them all, and we certainly cannot take every rejection we deliver personally, because, in the end, you need the right person for the role, not just anyone. As NewHire puts it, “Every job deserves the right person!” and your job is no exception. You will have to reject some good candidates along the way in order to hire the right candidate. For more information on best practices for making employment offers, check out our webinar recording on Step 6 in the recruiting process: Hire ’em!

Things are going great. Candidates are flowing in everyday and you are sorting through as they arrive. Two weeks have now gone by and the traffic is starting to fade. You think, “Oh no!! But I haven’t found the right person yet!” Nothing to fear, you just need to re-advertise! It costs money to find the right person, but in the end it will pay off when you fill an important role in your company.

time-273857_1280 (2)

There are a couple of reasons why you might need to re-advertise, and once you discover that reason, you should consider the best times to actually do the re-posting. It’s not always a quick fix – so you should also consider patience a necessary virtue during this time. Take the time to understand what might need improvement to attract a great pool of candidates.

Here are some reasons and solutions you might need to re-advertise:

1. You’ve advertised, but candidates eventually stopped applying.

Candidates look at new postings first. As your ad ages, it will generate less traffic as newer jobs are being posted. Additionally, your sponsored budget runs out, or your job board posting could have expired.  It can be effective to repost to bring your job up to the top and to attract fresh attention for candidates.

Time to Re-Post: If you really need more people, consider re-advertising two weeks after the initial posting – if it is a sponsored budget, start a new campaign as soon as the previous runs out. It is also an option to run an ad on one job board at a time to save money in case you come to find a job board isn’t working. This way you can focus your spending only on what is working.

2. You didn’t get many candidates.

If this happens, you might re-examine your job ad to make sure there is an attractive employee value proposition, compensation listed, and detailed job duties. Your job title might also have an affect on your candidate pool. If your title is too specific, it might be more difficult for candidates to search on. You should also watch out for labeling your job too generically such as a customer service representative, when you really want someone with advanced subject knowledge and extended experience.  Also examine the market of the industry to see if it is a good time to advertise.

Time to Re-Post: Take the time while your current advertising is running to re-work the job ad and try an alternative job title.. Get expert help on the compensation range if you’re unsure, then develop a solid employee value proposition. Once you’re ready with this, re-advertise or update your current ads to reflect your changes.

3. The person you hired didn’t work out. It happens.

Sometimes the candidate changes their mind about the position or thinks they are not a good fit. When this happens, especially when they held a vital role in your company, you need to revamp your recruiting to search for the right person

Time to Re-Post: If it’s an immediate need in your company, start advertising right away. See a recruitment expert at NewHire to get you up and running. Take a day before you advertise, to look at your ad once more to ensure you are attracting the right qualified candidates to your job.

Has your company experienced any of the situations above? Let NewHire help you get back on track and set you up with a job ad constructed by an expert and a wide range of advertising options. Just remember, every job deserves the right person!

Here at NewHire we work in a collaborative work environment with an open office space. Naturally, ideas come to life as we chat and learn more about co-workers by sitting right next to them with no barriers! One of the great things about working this way is that you can find exciting things to do weekly that are fun that most people will participate in as they are always nearby. All of us at NewHire have found that exciting thing to be food! Who doesn’t love a snack shared by the group?

We set out on a journey to find the “best of” in Chicago. We couldn’t randomly choose foods every week, we wanted it to have a solid end result. So, we focused in on a favorite breakfast treat: DONUTS!

Each Friday, either a co-worker volunteered to bring donuts from a different place, or the office collected donations and one person volunteered to pick them up. Depending on the cost, we purchased an assortment of 6-12 donuts per Friday. But how could you share just a few donuts among a big group of people? Well, we figured out pretty quickly that the best way to share and judge was by sampling each donut. So we cut all the donuts in small pieces, tasted, and then, yes, we rated each donut individually on a shared spreadsheet. We enjoyed eating donuts for 8 weeks!

Check out our rankings for the best donuts below!

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What’s next for NewHire? Pizza! We enjoyed the weekly treats so much that we decided to continue with an improved plan. Now we are setting out to find the tastiest pizza in Chicago! What are you doing that’s fun for your office? Please comment and let us know what you think makes your business a great place to work!

According to Dr. Albert Mehrabian, author of Silent Messages, nonverbal behavior accounts for over 55% of daily communication. When it comes to interviews, it is very important to be aware and in control of your non-verbal behavior.

Whether you are the interviewer or the interviewee, the interview is the time to use non-verbal communication to show that you are really paying attention. Most of us are not even aware of what message we are sending with our body when speaking with other individuals. The person we are speaking with might get an impression that is opposite of our intention. Below are a few common non verbal cues we may not realize are sending the wrong message to potential employers.

Body Language 1

Body Language 101: The Handshake

There are many ways to shake hands, but only one right way to shake the hand of a potential employer. No one likes a limp fish where you barely grab someone’s hand and it feels like a fish, softly flopping up and down in your palm. On the other hand (no pun intended), you should also avoid the hand cruncher.  Don’t squeeze so tight that someone might think you’re angry and want to break their hand. Stick with a firm handshake that shows you’re confident and professional.

Attire

Ever hear the saying “dress for the job you want” thrown around? Well it’s true! If you are interviewing for an executive position, look like an executive. Nice button up and slacks at the very least – or slacks, dress, or skirt. Even if you are interviewing for an office job or sales position, you should look at least business casual. In short, do your best to look presentable. Even though your attire doesn’t necessarily reflect your experience, your appearance does affect the potential employer’s first impression of you.

Eye contact

Look the interviewer in the eyes. It might seem a little scary at first, but once you get more comfortable in the interview it will be easier. Making eye contact shows you’re confident. Once you start looking away, staring at your lap, or glancing at your watch, the employer might assume you’re either not interested or can’t stay focused. It’s natural to be nervous, employers expect that, but don’t let your nerves takeover your whole interview.

Folding arms

Nothing says “I don’t want to talk to you” more than folding your arms. Folding your arms is seen as a wall you are placing between you and the interviewer. This non-verbal behavior shows you are guarded and standoffish. Keep your arms open, relaxed on your lap or your hands folded together. Use your arms and hands to portray a positive message.

Leaning back

Sometimes in an interview you might sit in a chair that allows you to lean back. Don’t do it. When you lean back, you might be giving the non-verbal communication that you are pulling away from an employer. Sit upright and with good composure. Use your body language to show that you are listening, interested, and engaged in the conversation.

All of these things can be mastered with practice. Sometimes it takes a couple of interviews to really get on the right track, but once you are aware of the non-verbal behaviors, you can learn how to correct them. Ready to start interviewing? You can start applying for jobs today by visiting the NewHire job board or follow NewHire on Facebook and Twitter!