Archives For Step 1 – Preparing to Recruit

Planning a hire is one of the most important steps of the hiring process. When you recruit and hire with NewHire, you get more than software — we’ll help you through the planning process, too!

“Hire the right people by making your job enticing” was originally published for the OKSPA. See the full blog at the link below:

My company is based on this premise: Every job deserves the right person. We help businesses improve their chances of making good hires.

The first thing we discover with most of our clients is that they need help getting ready to hire, which I believe is the most important part of the hiring process. If you don’t do it well, you’re going to end up hiring somebody, but it’s not likely to be the right person.

I’m going to focus on what I consider the two most important parts of getting ready to hire—the employee value proposition and the job description.

Read more about those two most important parts here.

Machine learning in recruitingIf you haven’t heard about how machine learning is changing the entire landscape of recruiting, it might be time to call your real estate agent and get them to put “For Sale” sign on the rock you’ve been living under the past three months. Just kidding, but seriously: everyone is talking about it. If you want to do some catching up, here are a few good places to start:

How Machine Learning is Revolutionizing Recruiting: “Recruiters can start to recognize pure data points of candidates’ contact information, their profile, their work history, etc. and be able to match those with opportunities. Machine learning does not automatically select the best candidate, instead it narrows the field of search and allows us to focus on analyzing the intangibles.”

What Machine Learning Can Bring to Corporate Recruiting: “So using historical data to predict what a human being will do or like isn’t that new but it is only now that the world’s HR departments are realizing how valuable it can be. Combining employee and candidate data in the right way can help companies get more out of their most important assets: human capital.”

With to all of the hysteria surrounding the topic, I considered titling this blog “This Millennial just used Machine Learning to destroy the Fake News about Recruiting.” I surely would have had more clicks. Machine Learning is the buzzword flying around in the recruiting world today. It’s the mystical, magical solution to all of your problems. The fact of the matter is, like all buzzwords, the idea behind machine learning in recruiting comes from a place of relative truth and good science. Using a computer to analyze the processes and outcomes of recruiting will allow you to make better recruiting decision, given a quality dataset and a well-engineered analysis.

Unfortunately (you knew a “but” was coming), the blog-o-sphere got a hold of this idea, and now you need a facial recognition software, a Google-sized recruiting budget, and an in-depth understanding of quantum mechanics in order to have a shot at hiring the right person for a job. While one of those things was a joke that no blogger has ever recommended for hiring better, all three are equally unnecessary for success in recruiting. Recruiting and hiring is hard, and any blog claiming that a robot is going to make it less hard is peddling you the same rubbish that applicant tracking systems have been pushing for years.

How you can replicate machine learning in your recruiting process

The fundamental idea behind machine learning in recruiting is a rock solid one. Instead of relying on your shortcuts – reading resumes, throwing out the ones with goofy names, throwing out the ones who misspelled something, keeping all of the ones who went to the same college as you – you are forced to rely on a computer’s analysis of a candidate. The computer has a quality dataset with information about the candidates who have already been successful at your company. Essentially, it is benchmarking your set of candidates against the criteria it thinks has led to success in the past.

A computer’s benchmarking, given a quality data set and a complex algorithm, will be better than your resume search. That’s a given. But it will never be without mistakes. If you learn nothing else from this blog post, learn this: recruiting is hard. There is no magic pill.

There is, however, good process. Take anybody at your company who has been in the position you are trying to hire for and had success and ask them as many questions as you can think of. Ask them things you might ask a candidate who is coming to work at your company. How many years of experience did you have when you started? What skills did you come to us with? What work behaviors do you possess that you think lead to successful outcomes for yourself and for our business? What motivates you?

Once you have their answers, figure out which ones you can identify during your recruiting process. If your best sales representatives came into the company with zero sales experience, you’ve just learned something about what makes a person successful at your company. If your best customer service representatives are motivated by the positive feedback they receive from your clients, you know how your best future CSR’s ought to be motivated.

Here’s the important part: once you’ve got some criteria set aside, ask your candidates these questions while they apply. Don’t sort through your candidate pool using their resumes. Don’t sort through them based on who submitted a .pdf resume and who submitted a .doc resume (trust me, it has happened.) Ask them the questions that you asked your current employees and use their answers to decide who to talk to. If all of your best sales reps are motivated by money, you should be molding your recruiting process around hiring candidates who love making money. Ask a multiple choice question about what motivates them to be successful in sales, and interview the ones who chose “Money!”

There! You did it. You’re a recruiting machine. Again, this is not the magic pill. In order to reap the benefits of this system, you have to commit to it. Contact everyone who answered your questions the right way. No shortcuts. By setting up our process this way, you will be eliminating 90% of the fluff – those candidates who answer every employment ad and aren’t qualified for your position; they won’t answer your questions the way you want them to. The rest is up to you. Happy hiring.

Today’s Wall Street Journal lead editorial focuses on “America’s Growing Labor Shortage.” The text is 14 paragraphs long, 13 of which detail the problems – construction and farm labor shortages – and one paragraph recommending somebody do something about it.

Every word of the editorial is true, yet stunningly insufficient. The recommendation? “… the U.S. will need to improve education and skills in manufacturing and IT.” The “U.S.” doesn’t “do” anything! Business leaders, state and federal leaders, academic leaders all need to “do” a number of specific actions to start to solve these shortages.

For instance, Hands-On CNC Training, a program in northern Illinois run by the TMA (Tooling and Manufacturing Association) is matching entry level candidates to CNC manufacturing jobs, providing an hourly wage, on-the-job and classroom training and the promise of a full time job on graduation. Funding comes from multiple sources (including the businesses that will benefit most from the investment).

Labor shortageI know that “union” is a dirty word for the WSJ. However, looking backward, it seems obvious today that union busting has had the negative consequence of reducing the pool of trained construction (and other) workers. Yes, unions may create additional expense for employers, but at least some of that expense paid for unions to train new members. This ensured the perpetuation of union and the availability of skilled workers to business. No institution has stepped forward to replace this training function, hence a shortage of workers. Companies that work collaboratively with unions to ensure a trained workforce suffer fewer labor shortages.

Another type of failure we see is a failure of imagination. Whether the open positions are in agriculture, manufacturing, construction, high-tech, or healthcare, employers do a poor job of helping potential employees picture what a career in their industry will be like. When employers spend time and money looking for “experienced” workers in fields that have shortages, they waste effort. Spend time and money educating future employees on the benefits of a career in their field. Spend effort identifying the work behaviors, motivations and skills required for the jobs and then find matching people regardless of experience. Then hire, train, and help new employees grow. Waiting for others to train your workers is a recipe for shortages.

And finally, in agreement with the WSJ editorial, bring in more, not fewer foreign workers for skilled and unskilled positions. Don’t restrict work visas.

At NewHire we believe “Every Job Deserves the Right Person,” and we work hard every day with employers all over the U.S. to help them hire better!

I recently sold my home of almost 25 years. It was a heart wrenching, game changing, long time coming event. It also gave me a new perspective on recruiting.  I know that sounds nerdy, but it’s true (it’s also probably why my house has an eclectic, even eccentric, look. Maybe I should be thinking about decorating instead?). Recruiting & hiring a new employee and selling a home have so many similarities – and some HUGE differences.

Recruiting & hiring and selling house

Image credit: Mark Moz

Both recruiting and selling a home are lengthy, multi-step processes that have an uncertain outcome. The impact of this uncertainty should not be underestimated. The uncertain outcome can cause surprising and sometimes disruptive emotions at various stages of the process – from elation and excitement to disappointment and despair – the emotional journey can be a bit of a roller coaster. We might even delay project launch or needlessly draw out some aspects of the project as a result of that roller coaster ride. Additionally, the need for high cost outside expertise can seem like a roadblock. But where there is great risk there is often opportunity for great return. I invite you to come with me on this journey. Continue Reading…

A new “salary estimator” feature Indeed is currently testing and rolling-out for mobile jobseekers may have significant impact on the effectiveness of your Indeed advertising campaigns. For some time, Indeed has listed applications that include compensation information with a brief blurb on how they are displayed. Recently, Indeed expanded that feature to include an estimated compensation for mobile users. This salary estimate is displayed both for positions that list the compensation in the ad and for postings that do not explicitly list a compensation range.

Salary estimator

This is an example of the new feature in action. Notice the grey text indicating “$30,000 – $33,000 a year estimated by Indeed”.

How does it affect applications with no compensation figures listed?

If Indeed’s salary estimation is exactly accurate, the worst that can happen is that candidates find out your role’s compensation earlier in the process than you wanted. More likely, the estimated range will be higher or lower than your actual ideal range. This will be particularly true as they continue to refine their estimates (it’s only in beta and will presumably get more accurate over time) and if your position has a broad title. Each of these bring clear negative ramifications for your recruiting process. If their estimate is lower than your actual range, it’s possible that highly qualified candidates that would seek a higher compensation will be deterred. If Indeed’s estimate is higher than your range you will receive more candidates than you would otherwise, but when it comes to negotiation, candidates may have unrealistic expectations of what your offer will be. It is worth reiterating that this is currently in beta and is only being tested; it will not effect every job or every market.

Why is Indeed doing this?

Based on data Indeed collects, candidates are more likely to engage with job postings when salary figures are available. Ultimately, Indeed’s goal is to increase the likelihood that candidates click postings and to improve the candidate experience when job searching by giving them additional information.

What can you do?

Our best practice continues to be to list compensation figures in your application when you can. This change to Indeed is just one more reason why it is better to list a competitive compensation and to remain in control of how candidates perceive your jobs.

From employee to employer: some important reasons why you should take your time to hire.

“There’s such a difference between us

And a million miles” – Adele

Take it from the music of Grammy Award winning artist Adele, some people are just not who you thought they were. It takes a lot of life experiences and a different perspective to really understand why or why not someone will be a match for you. It takes time to get to know someone and just like finding the love of your life, the recruiting process has to be taken slowly and seriously.

And like Adele, sometimes we end up with a broken heart instead of love, just like an employer might recognize they hired a bad apple instead of a star employee. It’s in these cases that we need to learn from our mistakes and move forward instead of living life sounding like a broken record. I’ve had many jobs where I’ve sat in the passenger seat, watching the driver make the tough decisions of when to turn left or right, or when they should just flat out do a donut. In all these learning experiences I had a unique perspective on entire operations and office cultures, internalizing how the right people for the right jobs interact in particular environments.

Take your time to hire

This has given me great appreciation for how much work it takes to create that environment – that hard-working team each company needs to succeed. One of the things needed to create that great team is a solid recruiting process, one that is thoughtful, effective, and comprehensive. However, all too often employers are in a hurry to hire, and end up getting burned. Like Adele says, “They say that time’s supposed to heal ya, but I ain’t done much healing.” Employers – here’s some aloe gel insights to help heal all the recruiting burns you’ve had so far.

First, let me point out the losses that occur when the recruiting process is rushed:

  1. Lose time – If you hire someone too quickly, you might end up hiring someone unqualified, which means you end up spending more time training them. You might also discover they’re unqualified and have to re-start the process, which takes even more time.
  2. Lose money – Hiring costs money. Not just in the salary and compensation that you pay the candidate, but in the advertising, assessments, and other supplemental documents that go into acquiring that candidate. If you rush this process, you might be putting all of that money into the wrong candidate. Don’t pay twice!
  3. Lose quality – It is crucial before advertising that your job description establishes what skills, motivations, and behaviors you’re looking for. Take your time, and stick to those criteria as you screen candidates. When you hire too quickly, you could end up with someone who does not have all of the qualities you need.
  4. Lose patience – “Patience is a virtue, best keep it if you can.” This goes for recruiting as well. If you rush the process, you will lose your patience and may settle for someone less qualified. Set reasonable expectations and be thorough.
  5. Lose people – If you hire someone who is a poor fit for your company culture and work environment, then you may see a negative impact on productivity or your team morale. One of the most regrettable things that could happen to your company is hiring the wrong person and seeing your decision have a rippling effect on your employees.

Second, let me point out the positive actions you can take during the hiring process that can prevent some of those losses:

  1. Establish Timeline – The time it takes to hire someone varies for every company based on a number of factors including company priorities, location, job market, supply/demand, etc. You will likely need to set aside a longer amount of time for harder to fill roles like engineers, but you may be able to fill administrative and entry level jobs a bit faster. Set realistic expectations for yourself before you begin recruiting and set some short-term goals along the way for interviews to keep your timeline on track.
  2. Create Budget – Recruiting costs will vary for every company, but it’s important to estimate and set aside budget for your recruiting. After you have set aside the budget for the candidate’s total compensation, you need to calculate costs for assessments, background checks, and advertising. The budget for these costs will vary depending on a variety of factors, including whether or not you need to re-advertise, how many candidates you decide to assess, and more.
  3. Identify Candidate – When you are going through the screening process, make sure you are asking the right questions that help you find the right person for the job. Get to know them to make sure that their skillset, workplace behaviors and motivations are in line with your goals for the role. Ask questions like:
    1. Why do you think you are right for our company?
    2. Talk about a time that you resolved a conflict.
    3. How do you stay organized?
  4. Keep Calm – Don’t settle. You’ll find the right person for the right job, even if it takes more time than you might like. You just have to be patient. It’s a tough virtue to keep, but by continuing to advertise, interview, and meet people, not only are you getting practice in recruiting, but you are getting a better understanding of the job you are hiring for.
  5. Maintain Rapport – Keep the team you do have, happy. Make sure you are aware of your internal culture and articulate that well in your job description. When you are interviewing in-person, observe the candidate’s behavior and how they interact with your staff. Ask yourself if you can see them integrating well into your workplace. Hiring great people and keeping rapport with your team will maintain morale and productivity.

In short – take your time to hire. Recruiting isn’t a quick task you want to get checked off a “to-do” list. Set goals, a budget and a timeline before you start your recruiting process. Identify the right people for the right jobs in your company by thoroughly assessing candidate skillsets, motivations and workplace behaviors at every step in the recruiting process. Make sure they match your company culture and align with your goals for the role. Keep your employees happy and you’ll be “Rolling in the Deep.”

In our high-tech, modern internet age, life moves pretty fast.  And no device helps us navigate the day-to-day struggles like a smartphone.  It’s something that has become ubiquitous and indispensable, which is pretty remarkable considering it’s a device that didn’t exist ten years ago.   Smartphones have changed the game for many industries.  From scheduling to gaming, to watching and making movies, or taking your office on the road, we can do practically anything with a mobile phone nowadays —  Even look for jobs.

Whether you are an employer looking to hire, or a candidate in search of a new job, mobile technology is impacting you. Smartphones make it easy to connect to job sites and see and apply to open positions.  Many career sites that allow someone to store their pertinent details online now have smartphone apps to make looking at jobs even faster and easier.  With the rise of internet browsing by mobile job seekers , we decided to parse through some of our recent traffic data and analyze what mobile job seekers are doing when they visit NewHire® jobs.  Our conclusions have shown, mobile users are like window shoppers.  Most candidates are “just looking”  – and few are actually buying.

We’ve found that our mobile traffic has skyrocketed in the last year. But all that extra traffic is just people looking at job ads, and not actually applying. Our conversion rate* (the number of applicants divided by the number of candidate views)  in that time has plummeted.  Interestingly though, we’ve also found that people in specific jobs or industries are more predisposed to apply by mobile device.

Highlights!

Mobile candidate traffic, on jobs advertised by NewHire®, has exploded this year.  In 2015  approximately  22%  of candidate traffic was from Mobile. this year, through October 2016,  that traffic has increased to almost 39%. of our total job seeker traffic. This increased mobile traffic is ALL JOBSEEKERS including people who only view applications AND people who actually apply.

Mobile Activity 2014-2016

Tip: Click our graphs to make them larger!

Mobile Desktop Views 2014-2016

Mobile Desktop Applies 2014-2016

When we dig deeper we see that mobile job seekers are window shoppers. They look but when it comes to applying for jobs on their mobile device, they are not buying. Our Mobile Views doubled this year compared to 2015. However those mobile viewers MOSTLY DID NOT CHOOSE TO APPLY TO THOSE JOBS ON THEIR DEVICE.  In 2016, through October,  we’ve had almost 300,000 views from Mobile devices, more than double all of 2015!  However, our mobile Apply count for 2016 is just about the same as for 2015.  Our 2016 Conversion Rate* for jobs has plummeted for Mobile traffic. There has not been been a noticeable increase in applicants to correspond with the increase in views.

Mobile Conversion Rates 2014-2016

But the story is more complicated. It turns out that some jobs attract lots of mobile applicants and others attract very few.  People who DO apply to jobs from their devices are doing so in some interesting industries.  The jobs with the highest Mobile Apply activity in 2015 and 2016 include those in the Medical field, those in Skilled Trade, Drivers, and Food Service Workers — these are all professions where someone doesn’t spend a lot of time sitting at a computer and probably won’t be filling out a job application that way.

Conversely, we noticed very low Mobile Apply activity for jobs including Executives, Managers, Engineers and Human Resources workers, who usually have better access to computers during their normal routines.

Top Mobile Activity By Job Industry

Mobile Activity by Job Industry

Why are Mobile users just window shopping? There could be any number of reasons. It could be related to job  or industry or location. It could be that candidates are looking and then coming back and applying later on either a desktop computer, or on their device. Or it could be that mobile employment applications are only important for some jobs and much less important for others.

Tl;dr or Key takeaways on Mobile Jobseekers

  • Mobile candidate traffic is rising and will continue to be important force in the employment market place in 2017.
  • Many mobile applicants are just window shopping and not applying for work.
  • For specific jobs including drivers, food service workers, skilled trades and medical – mobile is an important for capturing applicants. Be sure these types of jobs are advertising  on mobile platforms and be sure you have a mobile optimized application process.
  • For job in engineering, human resources or at the executive level mobile is much less crucial for capturing applicants.

Definitions:

  • Views = the count of people who look at a NewHire® candidate landing page and application. This link is an example of an application.
  • Applies = the count of people who submits an employment application to NewHire® for a specific employment opportunity.
  • Conversion Rate = Applicants (Applies/ Views) people who successfully fill out a job application) / Viewers (People who view a specific Job application

 

 

Imagine your worst nightmare as a recruiter – you’ve just found the perfect candidate for your job, they’ve passed through every interview, passed every test and have been universally accepted by everyone you’ve consulted with — except that one group you forgot to include, who now say this candidate is a no go.  Or maybe it’s the President of the company who has their own opinion of what the candidate’s qualification should be. In either scenario – you’re back to square one with your recruiting. How could this happen?  More importantly – how can it be prevented in the future.

These hiring misfires can happen because – before even sitting down to figure out the basics of the job you are recruiting for – you’ve failed to identify all of the Stakeholders involved.

Avoiding Hiring RoadblocksWhat’s a stakeholder?  In a project sense – a stakeholder is a person or group, internal or external to your company, that has an interest in your project, or will be somehow affected by the outcome of your project.  Stakeholders can have a direct or indirect interest and influence in your project, and knowing how to identify them all and manage their relationships to your project is a major task of a project manager.

In a Recruiting Sense – A Stakeholder is a group or individual who will either have a direct influence on the hiring process, or will be affected in some way by the hiring outcome.  Some are more influential than others, but all stakeholders will have some impact on the hire.

Some examples of recruiting stakeholders include:

  • Other groups/ teams in your company
  • Company Executives
  • Outside Vendors or Contractors
  • Unions
  • Customers (for external recruiters)

It’s in the best interest of the recruiter to identify all possible stakeholders and get them all on the same page with all the issues concerning the job being recruited. That way, any disagreements or other obstacles can be identified and addressed at the beginning of the process and not when candidates are at the door. That will ensure a smoother and more timely recruiting process and save time and money in the long run.

Small businesses hire sales people. Big businesses hire sales forces. There’s a very important distinction there. Given that only 1 in 4 sales people have the competence, the behaviors, the beliefs, and the motivations to be elite in a given organization, hiring a sales force is a numbers game that small businesses can’t afford to play. And yet, everyday we see small businesses doing the same things as their larger counterparts. They throw out a job description, collect resumes, find people with experience and that “sales” personality, and make a hire based on unreliable criteria.

Here’s a good example. These are two real candidates for a sales job for which NewHire recently recruited. The employer needed a business-to-business sales representative to sell software to CEO’s and owners of small and medium-sized businesses. The position required a salesperson to do mostly over-the-phone sales, where some leads would be provided, but the salesperson would have to supplement via their own prospecting. I will refer to two of the candidates in their applicant pool as Candidate A and Candidate B, and describe their sales talents in the same depth that we discovered them:

Candidate A, according to her resume:

Selecting Sales People

  • Worked in sales for 8 months before leaving the company and taking a job as a social media marketing manager for a research consulting agency
  • Had a 3 month gap in her work history, and not much information on experience beyond that one sales job
  • Has a bachelor’s degree from a small liberal arts college
  • Describes herself as “talented and results focused”

Candidate B, according to his resume:

  • Been in sales for 7 years and has just recently taken a sales management role for a “burgeoning technology company”
  • His sales experience was mostly business-to-business with some business-to-consumer experience
  • Has a bachelor’s degree from a Big Ten school
  • Describes himself as “loyal”

Given the above information, you might take a guess at which candidate is the better sales representative. Candidate B clearly has more experience. He also fits the industry that the employer works in, and has even moved up into sales management, right? If you’re like most companies, you would phone screen Candidate B and toss Candidate A in the resume shredder. Luckily, NewHire didn’t rely on this information alone. When we took a closer look, the picture of each candidate became a lot clearer.

Based on their answers to our careful questioning and an OMG Assessment, here’s what we learned about each candidate.

beliefs

sale-behaviors

truth-resumes

After further review, Candidate A clearly has the competency, skills, and behaviors that fit the employer’s need and are correlated with sales success. Here’s the deal: given a phone interview and a few in-person conversations, the employer probably never would have hired Candidate B anyway. Despite the attractive resume, they would have uncovered that he was not a fit and moved on — wasting only their valuable time in the process. The problem is not that Candidate B would have been hired… It’s that Candidate A would have never even been interviewed given the contents of her resume alone!

She was the perfect candidate and ended up being a very successful hire for the employer. Had they relied on her resume, she wouldn’t have had a chance at even talking to the employer on the phone. That’s the impact that the average hiring process has on the ability for a small business to hire successful salespeople. In some jobs, you can get by just screening for experience (although I would argue that including behaviors, motivations, and skills in the early stages of any recruitment search is ideal.) In sales, failing to uncover appropriate information about your candidate before ruling them out of the process is the number one way to miss out on your next superstar.

Imagine the impact a salesperson from the top 10% could have on your business this year alone. Can you afford to continue hiring the same, dangerous way just because resume screening is how you’ve always done it? No matter how you do it, a small business in search of a sales superstar must find out about a candidate’s sales behaviors and beliefs before making a yes or no decision on the candidate. Setting up a process that is specific to your company by which you can learn relevant information about a candidate before ruling them out will yield better results every time. There are plenty of tools out there to help save you time in building a custom process, but clearly it must be built. The old guess and check method for hiring salespeople is unsustainable, as the example above shows.

If you’re interested in learning more about the sales behaviors and beliefs that correlate to success in sales in all positions, and finding out which things to look out for that will make a difference for candidates at your company, check out Dave Kurlan’s White Paper on Sales Selection.

In recent months, NewHire has emphasized various reasons why we believe employers need to reconsider how the resume fits into their recruiting process. As the primary tool of assessing candidates, the resume is an antiquated, time consuming, and overall inaccurate way of identifying which candidates will be a fit for a position. However, beyond resumes being ineffective as a screening tool, there are more nefarious results of employers hiring on resumes alone: racial discrimination.

The Research

In 2002, University of Chicago Booth School of Business researchers Marianne Bertrand and Sendhil Mullainatghan published an article titled “Are Emily and Brendan More Employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination”. As that title implies, the research’s purpose was to investigate the impact of candidate names and implied race influenced the likelihood of receiving a callback from employers after submitting a resume. Focusing on the Chicago and Boston markets, resumes were randomly assigned a name that implied the candidate’s race as either white (i.e. Emily, Brendan) or black (i.e. Lakisha, Jamal). They also measured the impact of improvements to resume credentials increased the response rate. All combined, they sent out over 5000 resumes to a variety of industries and positions.

The results were staggering. Resumes with names typically associated with white candidates elicited approximately 50% more callbacks than those with perceived black candidate names. Furthermore, adding additional, higher credentials to resumes (more experience, more education) resulted in a 30% jump in calls to “white” resumes. Those same improvements to “black” resumes resulted in little to no improvement in the rate of being contacted by employers.

There is little reason to think things have changed since the year the study took place. In 2014, a man named José Zamora received national news attention when, in an effort to improve his job search results, he started to drop the “s” in his name to “Joe Zamora”. With that one letter change, results improved. Watch the video below to hear José’s story:

Organizations like Career Pathways recognize the problem and have worked to improve career opportunities for disadvantaged candidates. A PSA launched in 2014 titled “Grads of Life”, while not explicitly focused on assisting candidates of color, strongly urges employers to consider candidates from diverse backgrounds. The campaign remains active and, I can say from personal experience, has had subway and bus ads spring up around Chicago. I took the photo below waiting for the train earlier this year:

Resumes and racial bias

What can employers do to prevent discrimination?

Intentional or not, hiring managers are susceptible to displaying racial discrimination in the hiring process. One sure fire way of preventing such discrimination is to utilize a screening process and tool that allows hiring managers to get candidates to answer the questions that matter most to doing the job and then having the ability to search on those answers to identify top talent. Lucky for you, that’s what NewHire does! Not only will our Applicant Tracking System (ATS) cut down on the amount of time you spend reading resumes, it will also ensure that candidates are being judged on their competencies and experiences and not their age, sex, or race.